Publications by Year: 2014

2014
Y. Wang, Liu, J., Wang, P., Werth, C. J., and Strathmann, T. J., “Palladium Nanoparticles Encapsulated in Core–Shell Silica: A Structured Hydrogenation Catalyst with Enhanced Activity for Reduction of Oxyanion Water Pollutants,” ACS Catalysis, vol. 4, no. 10, pp. 3551–3559, 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Noble metal nanoparticles have been applied to mediate catalytic removal of toxic oxyanions and halogenated hydrocarbons in contaminated water using H2 as a clean and sustainable reductant. However, activity loss by nanoparticle aggregation and difficulty of nanoparticle recovery are two major challenges to widespread technology adoption. Herein, we report the synthesis of a core–shell-structured catalyst with encapsulated Pd nanoparticles and its enhanced catalytic activity in reduction of bromate (BrO3–), a regulated carcinogenic oxyanion produced during drinking water disinfection process, using 1 atm H2 at room temperature. The catalyst material consists of a nonporous silica core decorated with preformed octahedral Pd nanoparticles that were further encapsulated within an ordered mesoporous silica shell (i.e., SiO2@Pd@mSiO2). Well-defined mesopores (2.3 nm) provide a physical barrier to prevent Pd nanoparticle (∼6 nm) movement, aggregation, and detachment from the support into water. Compared to freely suspended Pd nanoparticles and SiO2@Pd, encapsulation in the mesoporous silica shell significantly enhanced Pd catalytic activity (by a factor of 10) under circumneutral pH conditions that are most relevant to water purification applications. Mechanistic investigation of material surface properties combined with Langmuir–Hinshelwood modeling of kinetic data suggest that mesoporous silica shell enhances activity by promoting BrO3– adsorption near the Pd active sites. The dual function of the mesoporous shell, enhancing Pd catalyst activity and preventing aggregation of active nanoparticles, suggests a promising general strategy of using metal nanoparticle catalysts for water purification and related aqueous-phase applications.
J. K. Choe, Boyanov, M., Liu, J., Kemner, K., Werth, C. J., and Strathmann, T. J., “X-Ray Spectroscopic Characterization of Immobilized Rhenium Species in Hydrated Rhenium-Palladium Bimetallic Catalysts used for Perchlorate Water Treatment,” J. Phys. Chem., Part C, vol. 118, 2014.
H. Yoon, Leibeling, S., Zhang, C., Mueller, R. H., Werth, C. J., and Zilles, J., “Aptation of Delftia acidovorans for degradation of 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetate in a microfluidic porous medium,” Biodegradation, vol. 25, pp. 595–604, 2014.
M. R. Saat, Werth, C. J., Schaeffer, D., Yoon, H., and Barkan, C. P. L., “Environmental risk analysis of hazardous material rail transportation,” J. Haz. Materials, vol. 264, pp. 560–569, 2014.
H. Liu, Valocchi, A. J., Werth, C. J., Kang, Q., and Oostrom, M., “

Pore-scale simulation of liquid CO2 displacement of water using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann model

,” Advances in Water Resources, vol. 73, pp. 144-158, 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract
A lattice Boltzmann color-fluid model, which was recently proposed by Liu et al. (2012) based on a concept of continuum surface force, is improved to simulate immiscible two-phase flows in porous media. The new improvements allow the model to account for different kinematic viscosities of both fluids and to model fluid–solid interactions. The capability and accuracy of this model is first validated by two benchmark tests: a layered two-phase flow with a variable viscosity ratio, and a dynamic capillary intrusion. This model is then used to simulate liquid CO2 (LCO2) displacing water in a dual-permeability pore network. The extent and behavior of LCO2 preferential flow (i.e., fingering) is found to depend on the capillary number (Ca), and three different displacement patterns observed in previous micromodel experiments are reproduced. The predicted variation of LCO2 saturation with Ca, as well as variation of specific interfacial length with LCO2 saturation, are both in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations. To understand the effect of heterogeneity on pore-scale displacement, we also simulate LCO2 displacing water in a randomly heterogeneous pore network, which has the same size and porosity as the simulated dual-permeability pore network. In comparison to the dual-permeability case, the transition from capillary fingering to viscous fingering occurs at a higher Ca, and LCO2 saturation is higher at low Ca but lower at high Ca. In either pore network, the LCO2–water specific interfacial length is found to obey a power-law dependence on LCO2 saturation.
M. Oostrom, Mehmani, Y., Romero-Gomez, P., Tang, Y., Liu, H., Yoon, H., Kang, Q., Joekar-Niasar, V., Balhoff, M. T., Dewers, T., Tartakovsky, G. D., Leist, E. A., Hess, N. J., Perkins, W. A., Rakowski, C. L., Richmond, M. C., and A., J., “

Pore-scale and continuum simulation of solute transport micromodel benchmark experiments

,” Comput. Geosci., vol. 10.1007/s10596-014-9424-0, pp. 1-23, 2014.
T. Boyd, Yoon, H., Zhang, C., Oostrom, M., Hess, N., Fouke, B., Valocchi, A. J., and Werth, C. J., “

The effect of magnesium on calcium carbonate precipitation during reactive transport in a model subsurface pore network

,” Geochimica Geocosmica Acta, vol. 135, pp. 321-335, 2014.