Publications

2017
S. Huang and Torres-Verdín, C., “Fast-forward modeling of compressional arrival slowness logs in high-angle and horizontal wells.,” Geophysics, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. D105-D120, 2017.
E. Bakolas, “On the finite time capture of a fast moving target,” Optimal Control, Applications and Methods, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 778-794, 2017.PDF icon jocam_2016_eb.pdf
H. Daigle, Hayman, N. W., Kelly, E. D., Milliken, K. L., and Jiang, H., “Fracture capture of organic pores in shales,” Geophysical Research Letters, 2017.
C. van der Hoeven, Montgomery, M., Sablan, G., Schneider, E., and Torres-Verdín, C., “Gadolinium tracers for enhancement of Sigma-log contrast measurements.,” Geophysics, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. EN13-EN24, 2017.
C. van der Hoeven, Montgomery, M., Sablan, G., Schneider, E., and Torres-Verdín, C., “Gadolinium tracers for enhancement of Sigma-log contrast measurements.,” Geophysics, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. EN13-EN24, 2017.
X. Meng, Pandey, T., Fu, S., Yang, J., Jeong, J., Chen, K., Singh, A., He, F., Xu, X., Singh, A. K., Lin, J. - F., and Wang, Y., “Giant Thermal Conductivity Enhancement in Multilayer MoS2 under Highly Compressive Strain,” eprint arXiv:1708.03849, 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Multilayer MoS2 possesses highly anisotropic thermal conductivities along in-plane and cross-plane directions that could hamper heat dissipation in electronics. With about 9% cross-plane compressive strain created by hydrostatic pressure in a diamond anvil cell, we observed about 12 times increase in the cross-plane thermal conductivity of multilayer MoS2. Our experimental and theoretical studies reveal that this drastic change arises from the greatly strengthened interlayer interaction and heavily modified phonon dispersions along cross-plane direction, with negligible contribution from electronic thermal conductivity, despite its enhancement of 4 orders of magnitude. The anisotropic thermal conductivity in the multilayer MoS2 at ambient environment becomes almost isotropic under highly compressive strain, effectively transitioning from 2D to 3D heat dissipation. This strain tuning approach also makes possible parallel tuning of structural, thermal and electrical properties, and can be extended to the whole family of 2D Van der Waals solids, down to two layer systems.
A. Weathers, Carrete, J., DeGrave, J. P., Higgins, J. M., Moore, A. L., Kim, J., Mingo, N., Jin, S., and Shi, L., “Glass-like thermal conductivity in nanostructures of a complex anisotropic crystal,” Phys. Rev. B, vol. 96, pp. 214202, 2017. Publisher's Version
K. Yang, Yilmaz, A. E., and Torres-Verdín, C., “A goal oriented framework for rapid integral-equation-based simulation of borehole resistivity measurements of 3D hydraulic fractures.,” Geophysics, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. D121-D131, 2017.
K. Yang, Yilmaz, A. E., and Torres-Verdín, C., “A goal oriented framework for rapid integral-equation-based simulation of borehole resistivity measurements of 3D hydraulic fractures.,” Geophysics, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. D121-D131, 2017.
M. Iqbal, Lyon, B. A., Ureña-Benavides, E. E., Moaseri, E., Fei, Y., McFadden, C., Javier, K. J., Ellison, C. J., Pennell, K. D., and Johnston, K. P., “High temperature stability and low adsorption of sub 100 nm magnetite nanoparticles grafted with sulfonated copolymers on Berea sandstone in high salinity brine,” Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, vol. 520, pp. 257-267, 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract
The synthesis of polymer grafted nanoparticles that are stable at high salinities and high temperature with low retention in porous media is of paramount importance for subsurface applications including electromagnetic imaging, enhanced oil recovery and environmental remediation. Herein, we present an improved approach to synthesize and purify sub-100 nm IONPs grafted with a random copolymer poly(AMPS-co-AA) (poly(2-acrylamido-3-methylpropanesulfonate-co-acrylic acid)) by means of catalyzed amide bond formation at room temperature. The improved and uniform polymer grafting of magnetic nanoparticles led to colloidal stability of IONPs at high temperature (120 °C) in API for a month. The transport behavior of the polymer grafted IONPs was investigated in crushed and in consolidated Berea sandstone. The high poly (AMPS-co-AA) polymer level on the surface (∼34%) provided electrosteric stabilization between the NPs and weak interactions of the NPs with anionic silica and sandstone surfaces. This behavior was enabled by low affinity of Ca2+ towards the highly acidic AMPS monomers thus enabling strong solvation in API brine. In crushed Berea sandstone, the retention was reduced by three fold and nine fold relative to our earlier studies, given the improvements in the grafted polymer layer. For intact core flood experiments in Berea sandstone carried out at elevated temperature (65 °C) and pressure (1000 psi net confining stress), the retention was 519 μg/g, comparable to the value for crushed Berea sandstone. Furthermore, the addition of a relatively small amount (0.1% v/v) of commercially available sacrificial polymer (e.g., HEC-10) further reduced IONP retention to 252 μg/g or 0.17 mg/m2 by blocking retentive sites
S. Alzobaidi, Da, C., Tran, V., Prodanović, M., and Johnston, K. P., “High temperature ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water foam stabilized with viscoelastic zwitterionic surfactants,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 488, pp. 79-91, 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) foams with gas phase volume fractions (ϕ) above 0.95 (that is <0.05 water) tend to be inherently unstable given that the large capillary pressures that cause the lamellar films to thin. Herein, we demonstrate that these C/W foams may be stabilized with viscoelastic aqueous phases formed with a single zwitterionic surfactant at a concentration of only 1% (w/v) in DI water and over a wide range of salinity. Moreover, they are stable with a foam quality ϕ up to 0.98 even for temperatures up to 120 °C. The properties of aqueous viscoelastic solutions and foams containing these solutions are examined for a series of zwitterionic amidopropylcarbobetaines, R-ONHC3H6N(CH3)2CH2CO2, where R is varied from C12–14 (coco) to C18 (oleyl) to C22 (erucyl). For the surfactants with long C18 and C22 tails, the relaxation times from complex rheology indicate the presence of viscoelastic wormlike micelles over a wide range in salinity and pH, given the high surfactant packing fraction. The apparent viscosities of these ultralow water content foams reached more than 120 cP with stabilities more than 30-fold over those for foams formed with the non-viscoelastic C12–14 surfactant. At 90 °C, the foam morphology was composed of ∼35 μm diameter bubbles with a polyhedral texture. The apparent foam viscosity typically increased with ϕ and then dropped at ϕ values higher than 0.95–0.98. The Ostwald ripening rate was slower for foams with viscoelastic versus non-viscoelastic lamellae as shown by optical microscopy, as a consequence of slower lamellar drainage rates. The ability to achieve high stabilities for ultralow water content C/W foams over a wide temperature range is of interest in various technologies including polymer and materials science, CO2 enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration (by greater control of the CO2flow patterns), and possibly even hydraulic fracturing with minimal use of water to reduce the requirements for wastewater disposal.
I. Kim, Nole, M., Jang, S., Ko, S., Daigle, H., Pope, G. A., and Huh, C., “Highly porous CO 2 hydrate generation aided by silica nanoparticles for potential secure storage of CO 2 and desalination,” RSC Advances, vol. 7, no. 16, pp. 9545-9550, 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract
We report a new way of storing CO2 in a highly porous hydrate structure, stabilized by silica nanoparticles (NPs). Such a porous CO2 hydrate structure was generated either by cooling down NP-stabilized CO2-in-seawater foams, or by gently mixing CO2 and seawater that contains silica NPs under CO2 hydrate-generating conditions. With the highly porous structure, enhanced desalination was also achievable when the partial meltdown of CO2 hydrate was allowed
J. Joseph, Tinney, C. E., and Murray, N., “Ideal gas effects in aeroacoustics,” 55th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, AIAA Paper 2017-0688. Grapevine, Texas, USA, 2017.Abstract
The use of helium-air mixtures to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures in aeroacoustics is plagued by the inability to match exactly the density and sound speed ratios between the jet flow and the ambient field, all the while maintaining the same gas dynamic Mach number and jet exit velocity. Real heated jet flows are typically achieved using either propane combustion in air or kerosene combustion in air, which results in the formation of carbon-dioxide and water vapor byproducts. In an effort to level the playing field between the heat simulated helium-air mixture system and the air breathing combustion system, a theoretical model is developed to isolate the effect of combustion byproducts on these aeroacoustic parameters to see if similar discrepancies arise. The motivation is to narrow the gap between laboratory and full-scale jet noise testing. Gas properties from the new combustion model are validated by laboratory measurements of a real propane combustion system as well as outputs from NASA’s Chemical Equilibrium with Applications code. The findings reveal how the additional combustion byproducts from propane combustion in air and kerosene combustion in air have a negligible effect on the parameters relevant to jet noise. Closer inspection of the helium-air mixture system demonstrates how variations in the Mach wave radiation angle at moderate pressure and temperature ratios of the nozzle is accurate to within a couple of degrees, relative to a pure heated air system. Similar accuracy is reported with the far-field intensity.
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A. Hassan, Chandra, V., Yutkin, M. P., Patzek, T. W., Espinoza, D. N., and others,Improving Pore Network Imaging & Characterization of Microporous Carbonate Rocks Using Multi-Scale Imaging Techniques,” in SPE Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition & Conference, 2017.
J. Tudek, Crandall, D., Fuchs, S. J., Werth, C. J., Valocchi, A. J., Chen, Y., and Goodman, A., “In situ contact angle measurements of liquid CO2, brine, and Mount Simon sandstone core using micro X-ray CT imaging, sessile drop, and Lattice Boltzmann modeling,” Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering, vol. 155, pp. 3-10, 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Three techniques to measure and understand the contact angle, θ, of a CO2/brine/rock system relevant to geologic carbon storage were performed with Mount Simon sandstone. Traditional sessile drop measurements of CO2/brine on the sample were conducted and a water-wet system was observed, as is expected. A novel series of measurements inside of a Mount Simon core, using a micro X-ray computed tomography imaging system with the ability to scan samples at elevated pressures, was used to examine the θ of residual bubbles of CO2. Within the sandstone core the matrix appeared to be neutrally wetting, with an average θ around 90°. A large standard deviation of θ (20.8°) within the core was also observed. To resolve this discrepancy between experimental measurements, a series of Lattice Boltzmann model simulations were performed with differing intrinsic θ values. The model results with a θ=80° were shown to match the core measurements closely, in both magnitude and variation. The small volume and complex geometry of the pore spaces that CO2 was trapped in is the most likely explanation of this discrepancy between measured values, though further work is warranted.
A. Frooqnia, Torres-Verdín, C., and Sepehrnoori, K., “Inference of near-borehole permeability and water saturation from time-lapse oil-water production logs,” Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering, vol. 152, no. April 2017, pp. 116-135, 2017.
C. Schroeder, Torres-Verdín, C., and Elshahawi, H., “Influence of mud-filtrate invasion effects on pressure gradients estimated from wireline formation-tester measurements (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) 58th Ann. Logging Symposium. Oklahoma City, OK, June 17-21, 2017.
S. Kelly, Torres-Verdín, C., and Balhoff, M., “Influence of polarity and hydration cycles on imbibition hysteresis in silica nanochannels,” Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, vol. 20, pp. 456-466, 2017.
H. Jung, Singh, G., Nicolas Espinoza, D., Wheeler, M. F., and others,An Integrated Case Study of the Frio CO 2 Sequestration Pilot Test for Safe and Effective Carbon Storage Including Compositional Flow and Geomechanics,” in SPE Reservoir Simulation Conference, 2017.
V. Puzyrev, Torres-Verdín, C., and Calo, V., “Interpretation of deep directional resistivity measurements in high-angle and horizontal wells (Expanded Abstract),” Sixth International Symposium on Three-Dimensional Electromagnetics. Berkeley, CA, March 28-30, 2017.

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