Publications by Year: 2013

2013
J. F. Bard, Gao, Z., Chacon, R., and Stuber, J., Daily Scheduling of Multi-Pass Lots at Assembly and Test Facilities. International Journal of Production Research 51(23-24), 2013, pp. 7044–7070.
A. Mobasher, Lim, G., Bard, J. F., and Jordan, V., Daily Scheduling of Nurses in Operating Suites. Chapter 55, 2013, pp. 1217–1241.
J. Sulzer, Duenas, J., Stampili, P., Hepp-Reymond, M. - C., Kollias, S., Seifritz, E., and Gassert, R., “Delineating the whole brain BOLD response to passive movement kinematics,” Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), 2013 IEEE International Conference on. IEEE, pp. 1-5, 2013.
M. R. Tucker, Moser, A., Lambercy, O., Sulzer, J., and Gassert, R., “Design of a wearable perturbator for human knee impedance estimation during gait,” Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), 2013 IEEE International Conference on. IEEE, pp. 1-6, 2013.
K. Yang, Celik, E., Torres-Verdín, C., and Yilmaz, A. E., “Detection and quantification of 3D hydraulic fractures with multi-component low-frequency borehole resistivity measurements (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Exploration Geophysicists 83rd Annual International Meeting. Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Houston, TX, 2013.PDF icon PDF
K. Yang, Celik, E., Torres-Verdín, C., and Yilmaz, A. E., “Detection and quantification of 3D hydraulic fractures with multi-component low-frequency borehole resistivity measurements (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) 83rd Ann. Internat. Mtg. Houston, TX, 2013.PDF icon PDF
A. Montaut, Sayar, P., and Torres-Verdín, C., “Detection and quantification of rock physics properties for improved hydraulic fracturing in hydrocarbon-bearing shale (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts 54th Annual Logging Symposium. Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts, New Orleans, LA, 2013.PDF icon PDF
A. Montaut, Sayar, P., and Torres-Verdín, C., “Detection and quantification of rock physics properties for improved hydraulic fracturing in hydrocarbon-bearing shale (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) 54th Ann. Logging Symposium. New Orleans, Louisiana, 2013.PDF icon PDF
D. L. Worthington, Pedrazas, N. A., and Taleff, E. M., “Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Molybdenum,” Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, vol. 44, pp. 5025–5038, 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract
A new abnormal grain growth phenomenon that occurs only during continuous plastic straining, termed dynamic abnormal grain growth (DAGG), was observed in molybdenum (Mo) at elevated temperature. DAGG was produced in two commercial-purity molybdenum sheets and in a commercial-purity molybdenum wire. Single crystals, centimeters in length, were created in these materials through the DAGG process. DAGG was observed only at temperatures of 1713 K (1440 °C) and above and occurred across the range of strain rates investigated, ~10−5 to 10−4 s−1. DAGG initiates only after a critical plastic strain, which decreases with increasing temperature but is insensitive to strain rate. Following initiation of an abnormal grain, the rate of boundary migration during DAGG is on the order of 10 mm/min. This rapid growth provides a convenient means of producing large single crystals in the solid state. When significant normal grain growth occurs prior to DAGG, island grains result. DAGG was observed in sheet materials with two very different primary recrystallization textures. DAGG grains in Mo favor boundary growth along the tensile axis in a <110> direction, preferentially producing single crystals with orientations from an approximately <110> fiber family of orientations. A mechanism of boundary unpinning is proposed to explain the dependence of boundary migration on plastic straining during DAGG.
S. M. Mula and Tinney, C. E., “Dynamical characteristics of the tip vortex from a four bladed rotor in hover,” Experiments in Fluids, vol. 54:1600, 2013.Abstract
Dynamical characteristics of tip vortices shed from a 1 m diameter, four-bladed rotor in hover are investigated using various aperiodicity correction techniques. Data are acquired by way of stereo-particle image velocimetry and comprises measurements up to 260 vortex age with 10 offsets. The nominal operating condition of the rotor corresponds to Rec = 248,000 and M = 0.23 at the blade tip. With the collective pitch set to 7.2 and a rotor solidity of 0.147, blade loading (CT/r) is estimated from blade element momentum theory to be 0.042. The findings reveal a noticeable, anisotropic, aperiodic vortex wandering pattern over all vortex ages measured. These findings are in agreement with recent observations of a full-scale, four-bladed rotor in hover operating under realistic blade loading. The principal axis of wander is found to align itself perpendicular to the slipstream boundary. Likewise, tip vortices trailing from different blades show a wandering motion that is in phase instantaneously with respect to one another, in every direction and at every wake age in the measurement envelope.
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B. M, D., B., Werner, S. L., and A., H., “The Dynamics of Signaling as a Pharmacological Target, Cell,” 155, pp. 24120141., 2013.
T. J. Watt, Yasuda, S., Ichitani, K., Takata, K., Carpenter, A., Jodlowski, J., and Taleff, E. M., “The Effect of Magnesium Content on Microstructure Evolution during Hot Deformation of Aluminum Alloys,” in Proceedings of the 2013 TMS Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, 2013, pp. 499–503. Publisher's Version
X. Chen, Weathers, A., Salta, D., Zhang, L. B., Zhou, J. S., Goodenough, J. B., and Shi, L., “Effects of (Al,Ge) Double Doping on the Thermoelectric Properties of Higher Manganese Silicides,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 114, pp. 173705, 2013. LinkAbstract
Experiments and analysis have been carried out to investigate the effects of Al and (Al,Ge) doping on the microstructure and thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples, which were prepared by solid-state reaction, ball milling, and followed by spark plasma sintering. It has been found that Al doping effectively increases the hole concentration, which leads to an increase in the electrical conductivity and power factor. By introducing the second dopant Ge into Al-doped HMS, the electrical conductivity is increased, and the Seebeck coefficient is decreased as a result of further increased hole concentration. The peak power factor is found to occur at a hole concentration between 1.8 × 1021 and 2.2 × 1021 cm−3 measured at room temperature. The (Al,Ge)-doped HMS samples show lower power factors owing to their higher hole concentrations. The mobility of Mn(Al0.0035 Ge ySi0.9965-y)1.8 with y = 0.035 varies approximately as T−3/2 above 200 K, suggesting acoustic phonon scattering is the dominant scattering mechanism. The thermal conductivity of HMS does not change appreciably by Al or (Al,Ge) doping. The maximum ZT of (Al,Ge)-doped HMS is 0.57 at 823 K, which is similar to the highest value found in the Al-doped HMS samples. The ZT values were reduced in the Mn(Al0.0035 Ge ySi0.9965-y)1.8 samples with high Ge concentration of y = 0.025 and 0.035, because of reduced power factor. In addition, a two-band model was employed to show that the hole contribution to the thermal conductivity dominates the bipolar and electron contributions for all samples from 300 to 823 K and accounts for about 12% of the total thermal conductivity at about 800 K.
J. Loskorn, Mills, A. F., Brady, J. F., Duthie, J. C., and Machemehl, R. B., “Effects of Bicycle Boxes on Bicyclist and Motorist Behavior at Intersections in Austin, Texas,” Journal of Transportation Engineering, 2013.Abstract
Provision of bicycle facilities at intersections is often inadequate and can lead to unsafe interactions between motorists and bicyclists. The bicycle box is a tool intended to improve the predictability of bicyclist stopping position at an intersection by allowing bicyclists utilizing a bicycle lane to position themselves in front of motorists during a red phase. The bicycle box in this application is meant to reduce the possibility of a right-hook collision, where a right turning motorist collides with a through moving bicyclist departing the intersection. The primary goal of this study was to determine what effect, if any, bicycle boxes have on bicyclist and motorist behavior. In 2009, 950 bicyclists were observed at two sites in three phases: existing conditions, after bicycle box markings were installed, and after a green colored pavement marking was added to the bicycle box and approaching bicycle lane. The predictability of bicyclists’ behavior improved based on the increased percentage of bicyclists who used the bicycle lane to approach the intersection, departed the intersection before motorists, and stopped in front of the motor vehicle queue. While only 20% to 26% of bicyclists stopped in the bicycle box area after installation of the bicycle box markings, over 90% of bicyclists stopped in front of motorists and were therefore more visible to motorists. The addition of the green pavement markings led to significant improvements in bicyclist behavior, but at a considerably higher material cost. Motorist encroachment on the bicycle box was common at both sites as well as illegal right turns on red at one site. No bicycle-motorist collisions were observed during any stage of the study. Read More: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/(ASCE)TE.1943-5436.0000584
M. T. Pettes, Maassen, J., Jo, I., Lundstrom, M., and Shi, L., “Effects of Surface Band Bending and Scattering on Thermoelectric Transport in Suspended Bismuth Telluride Nanoplates,” Nano Letters, vol. 13, no. 11, pp. 5316–5322, 2013. LinkAbstract
A microdevice was used to measure the in-plane thermoelectric properties of suspended bismuth telluride nanoplates from 9 to 25 nm thick. The results reveal a suppressed Seebeck coefficient together with a general trend of decreasing electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity with decreasing thickness. While the electrical conductivity of the nanoplates is still within the range reported for bulk Bi2Te3, the total thermal conductivity for nanoplates less than 20 nm thick is well below the reported bulk range. These results are explained by the presence of surface band bending and diffuse surface scattering of electrons and phonons in the nanoplates, where pronounced n-type surface band bending can yield suppressed and even negative Seebeck coefficient in unintentionally p-type doped nanoplates.
C. Xu, Torres-Verdín, C., and Gao, S., “Electrical vs hydraulic rock types in clastic reservoirs: pore-scale understanding verified with field observations in the Gulf of Mexico, U. S. (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Exploration Geophysicists 83rd Annual International Meeting. Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Houston, TX, 2013.PDF icon PDF
C. Xu, Torres-Verdín, C., and Gao, S., “Electrical vs. hydraulic rock types in clastic reservoirs: pore-scale understanding verified with field observations in the Gulf of Mexico, U.S. (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) 83rd Ann. Internat. Mtg. Houston, TX, 2013.PDF icon PDF
D. W. Dykstra, Dalby, K. N., and Ren, P., “Elucidating binding modes of zuonin A enantiomers to JNK1 via in silico methods,” Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling, vol. 45, pp. 38-44, 2013.
D. W. Dykstra, Dalby, K. N., and Ren, P., “Elucidating binding modes of zuonin A enantiomers to JNK1 via in silico methods,” Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling, vol. 45, pp. 38–44, 2013.
R. Zhang, Shuai, D., Guy, K. A., Shapley, J. R., Strathmann, T. J., and Werth, C. J., “Elucidation of nitrate reduction mechanisms on a Pd-In bimetallic catalyst using isotope labeled nitrogen species,” ChemCatChem, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 313–321, 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract
To understand nitrate reduction pathway and to improve selectivity towards dinitrogen (N2) over toxic ammonia species (NH4+, NH3), aqueous reduction experiments with an Al2O3‐supported Pd‐In bimetallic catalyst were conducted by using isotope‐labeled nitrite (15NO2−). Nitrite is the first reduction intermediate of nitrate. Experiments were performed using nitrite alone and in combination with unlabeled proposed reduction intermediates (N2O, NO), and using only N2O and NO alone, each as a starting reactant. Use of 15N‐labeled species eliminates interference from ambient N2 when assessing mass balances and product distributions. Simultaneous catalytic reduction of 15NO2− and 14N2O shows no isotope mixing in the final N2 product, demonstrating that N2O does not react with other NO2− reduction intermediates; N2O reduction alone yielded only N2. In contrast, simultaneous catalytic reduction of 15NO2− and 14NO yielded mixed‐labeled 15/14N2 (MW: 29), whereas reduction of 15NO alone yields a mixture N2 and NH4+, the ratio of which varies with initial 15NO concentration. These findings, along with those from a new kinetic model we propose, indicate that highly reactive adsorbed NO (NO*), or other unspecified adsorbed N species (Nads), is a key intermediate involved in determining final product selectivity.

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