Publications by Year: 2010

2010
C. Shu, Ge, J., Zhang, J., Sim, H. J., Burke, B. G., Williams, K. A., Rylander, M. N., Campbell, T., Geohegan, D., Esker, A. R., Gibson, H. W., and Dorn, H. C., “2010, "A Facile High-Speed Vibration Milling Method to Water-Disperse Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns, " Chemistry of Materials,” 22, 347�351. M. A. Kosoglu, R. L. Hood, Y. Chen, Y. Xu, M. N. Rylander, and C. G. Rylander, 2010, "Fiberoptic Microneedles for Transdermal Light Delivery: Ex Vivo Porcine Skin Experiments," Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, 2010.
C. Chafin, Muse, S., Hontecilla, R., Bassaganya-Riera, J., Caudell, D. L., Shimp, S., Rylander, M. N., Zhang, J., Li, L., and Reilly, C. M., “2010, "Deletion of PPAR-gamma in Immune Cells Enhances Susceptibility to Anti-GBM disease, " Journal of Inflammation Research,” 2010.
J. - K. Chang, Takata, K., Ichitani, K., and Taleff, E. M., “Abnormal Grain Growth and Recrystallization in Al-Mg Alloy AA5182 following Hot Deformation,” Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, vol. 41, pp. 1942–1953, 2010. LinkAbstract
Abnormally large grains have been observed in Al-Mg alloy AA5182 sheet material after forming at elevated temperature, and the reduced yield strength that results is a practical problem for commercial hot-forming operations. The process by which abnormal grains are produced is investigated through controlled hot tensile testing to reproduce the microstructures of interest. Abnormal grains are shown to develop strictly during static annealing or cooling following hot deformation; the formation of abnormal grains is suppressed during plastic straining. Abnormal grains grow by static abnormal grain growth (SAGG), which becomes a discontinuous recrystallization process when abnormal grains meet to form a fully recrystallized microstructure. Nuclei, which grow under SAGG, are produced during hot deformation by the geometric dynamic recrystallization (GDRX) process. The mechanism through which a normally continuous recrystallization process, GDRX, may be interrupted by a discontinuous process, SAGG, is discussed.
Y. Wang, Yu, X., and Venkatasubramanian, R., “Acoustic Phonon Scattering in Bi2Te3 /Sb2Te3 Superlattices,” Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 97, pp. 083103, 2010.PDF icon PDF
H. N. G. Wadley, Dharmasena, K. P., He, M. Y., McMeeking, R. M., Evans, A. G., Bui-Thanh, T., and Radovitzky, R., “An active concept for limiting injuries caused by air blasts,” International Journal of Impact Engineering, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 317–323, 2010.
U. Yildirim and Hasenbein, J. J., “Admission Control and Pricing in a Queue with Batch Arrivals,” Operations Research Letters, vol. 38, pp. 427-431, 2010.Abstract
We investigate a problem of admission control and pricing in a firm which dominates the market. In the model, there is a single server with exponential service times and arrivals follow a compound Poisson process where the number of customers in a group is an arbitrary discrete random variable. Each arriving group calculates the expected return for the whole group using the waiting cost per unit time, the current queue length, the price provided by the firm and the substitute product reward. It is assumed the firm is a monopoly and price maker per se. The firm’s problem is to set state dependent prices for arriving batches. Once the prices have been set we formulate the admission control problem for the firm, which is a Markov decision process. Properties of the pricing and value functions are characterized, as are the optimal admission policies for a revenue maximizing firm and a social optimizer.
B. K. Jesiek, Borrego, M., and Beddoes, K., “Advancing Global Capacity for Engineering Education Research (AGCEER): Relating research to practice, policy, and industry,” Journal of Engineering Education, vol. 35, pp. 107–119, 2010. Publisher's Version
L. Hildebrandt, Engelhart, G. J., Mohr, C., Kostenidou, E., Lanz, V. A., Bougiatioti, A., DeCarlo, P. F., Prevot, A. S. H., Baltensperger, U., Mihalopoulos, N., Donahue, N. M., and Pandis, S. N., “Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: The Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment – 2008,” Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, vol. 10, pp. 4167–4186, 2010.
C. M. Hessel, Rasch, M., Hueso, J. L., Goodfellow, B., Akhavan, V. A., Puvanakrishnan, P., Tunnell, J. W., and Korgel, B. A., “Alkyl Passivation and Amphiphilic Polymer Coating of Silicon Nanocrystals for Medical Diagnostic Imaging,” Small, vol. 6, pp. 2026–2034, 2010.
D. N. Espinoza and Santamarina, J. C., “Ant tunneling—a granular media perspective,” Granular Matter, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 607–616, 2010.
E. Crede, Borrego, M., and McNair, L. D., “Application of community of practice theory to the preparation of engineering graduate students for faculty careers,” Advances in Engineering Education, vol. 2, pp. 1–22, 2010. Publisher's Version
M. J. Nam, Pardo, D., and Torres-Verdín, C., “Assessment of Delaware and Groningen effects on dual-laterolog measurements with a self-adaptive hp finite-element method,” Geophysics, vol. 75, pp. F143-F149, 2010.PDF icon PDF
M. J. Nam, Pardo, D., and Torres-Verdín, C., “Assessment of Delaware and Groningen effects on dual-laterolog measurements with a self-adaptive hp finite-element method,” Geophysics, vol. 75, pp. F143-F149, 2010.PDF icon PDF
J. O. Tam, Tam, J. M., Murthy, A., Ingram, D., Ma, L. L., Travis, K., Johnston, K. P., and Sokolov, K., “Biodegradable Near-Infrared Plasmonic Nanoclusters for Biomedical Applications,” in Plasmonics in Biology and Medicine Vii, vol. 7577, T. VoDinh and Lakowicz, J. R., Ed. 2010. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Nanoparticles such as gold and silver with plasmonic resonances in the near-infrared (NIR) optical region, where soft tissue is the most transparent, are of great interest in biomedical applications. A major roadblock in translation of inorganic nanoparticles to clinical practice for systemic targeting of disease is their non-biodegradable nature. In addition, gold nanoparticles that absorb in the NIR are typically greater than 50 nm, which is above the threshold size of 5.5 nm required for effective excretion from the body. Here we describe a new class of biodegradable gold nanoparticles with plasmon resonances in the NIR region. The synthesis is based on controlled assembly of very small (less than 5 nm) primary gold particles into nanoclusters with sub-100 nm overall diameter and an intense NIR absorbance. The assembly is mediated by biodegradable polymers, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polylactic acid (PLA) copolymer, and small capping ligands on the constituent nanoparticles. Nanoclusters deaggregate into sub-5nm primary gold particles upon biodegradation of the polymer binder in live cells over one week, as shown by dark-field reflectance and hyperspectral imaging.
J. O. Tam, Tam, J. M., Murthy, A., Ingram, D., Ma, L. L., Travis, K., Johnston, K. P., and Sokolov, K., “Biodegradable Near-Infrared Plasmonic Nanoclusters for Biomedical Applications,” in Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications Ii, vol. 7576, S. Achilefu and Raghavachari, R., Ed. 2010. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Nanoparticles such as gold and silver with plasmonic resonances in the near-infrared (NIR) optical region, where soft tissue is the most transparent, are of great interest in biomedical applications. A major roadblock in translation of inorganic nanoparticles to clinical practice for systemic targeting of disease is their non-biodegradable nature. In addition, gold nanoparticles that absorb in the NIR are typically greater than 50 nm, which is above the threshold size of 5.5 nm required for effective excretion from the body. Here we describe a new class of biodegradable gold nanoparticles with plasmon resonances in the NIR region. The synthesis is based on controlled assembly of very small (less than 5 nm) primary gold particles into nanoclusters with sub-100 nm overall diameter and an intense NIR absorbance. The assembly is mediated by biodegradable polymers, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polylactic acid (PLA) copolymer, and small capping ligands on the constituent nanoparticles. Nanoclusters deaggregate into sub-5nm primary gold particles upon biodegradation of the polymer binder in live cells over one week, as shown by dark-field reflectance and hyperspectral imaging.
S. J. Yoon, Mallidi, S., Tam, J. M., Tam, J. O., Murthy, A., Joshi, P., Johnston, K. P., Sokolov, K. V., and Emelianov, S. Y., “Biodegradable plasmonic nanoclusters as contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging,” in Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2010, vol. 7564, A. A. Oraevsky and Wang, L. V., Ed. 2010. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Metallic nanoparticles have been widely used in a variety of imaging and therapeutic applications due to their unique optical properties in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions - for example, various plasmonic nanoparticles are used for molecular photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. However, there are concerns that these agents may not be safe under physiological conditions, because these nanoparticles are not biodegradable, could accumulate and, therefore, could be toxic long-term. We investigate the feasibility of using biodegradable gold nanoclusters as a contrast agent for highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging. The size of these biodegradable nanoclusters, consisting of sub-5 nm primary gold particles and a biodegradable polymer binder, is less than 100 nm. Due to plasmon coupling, these nanoclusters are characterized by a broad extinction spectrum that extends to the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. Photoacoustic imaging of tissue models containing inclusions with different concentrations of nanoparticles was performed using a tunable pulsed laser system. The results indicate that the biodegradable nanoclusters, comprised of small gold nanoparticles, can be used as contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging.
D. P. Morton, Bard, J. F., and Wang, Y. M., “A Branch-and-Price Algorithm for the Stochastic Generalized Assignment Problem,” in Chapter 7, C. O. : N. R. Developments, Linton, R. F., and Jr, C. T. B., Ed. 2010, pp. 207–236.
E. Torino, Reverchon, E., and Johnston, K. P., “Carbon dioxide/water, water/carbon dioxide emulsions and double emulsions stabilized with a nonionic biocompatible surfactant,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 348, pp. 469-478, 2010. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Whereas microemulsions and emulsions of water and carbon dioxide have been reported for various surfactants with fluorocarbon surfactants, relatively few studies have been successful in forming these emulsions with hydrocarbon surfactants. Stable CO(2)/water and water/CO(2) emulsions with droplets smaller than 1 mu m were formed at high shear with the nonionic surfactant polysorbate 80 (Tween 80). In order to understand the emulsion phase behavior at high shear, low shear phase behavior experiments were performed at the same temperature and pressure. For pressures up to 250 bar and temperatures of 25-60 degrees C, C/W emulsions were formed for water concentrations as low as 10%, as the surfactant is highly hydrophilic with limited CO(2)-philicity. However, with added NaCl, the surfactant partitioned away from water toward CO(2), and W/C emulsions were formed with droplet sizes from a few 100 nm to a few mu m in diameter, which were stable for at least 24 h. In addition C/W/C double emulsions are reported for the first time, as well as W/C/W/C triple emulsions. The ability to form emulsions with environmentally benign solvents, CO(2) and water, and biocompatible surfactants is desirable for green reaction and separation processes, as well as production of materials including pharmaceutical particles and composites. Published by Elsevier Inc.
E. P. Douglas, Koro-Ljungberg, M., and Borrego, M., “Challenges and promises of overcoming epistemological partiality: Advancing engineering education through acceptance of diverse ways of knowing,” European Journal of Engineering Education, vol. 35, pp. 247–257, 2010. Publisher's Version
Z. Xia, Gardner, D. P., Gutell, R. R., and Ren, P., “Coarse-grained model for simulation of RNA three-dimensional structures,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol. 114, pp. 13497–13506, 2010.

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