Ideal gas effects in aeroacoustics

Citation:

J. Joseph, Tinney, C. E., and Murray, N., “Ideal gas effects in aeroacoustics,” 55th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, AIAA Paper 2017-0688. Grapevine, Texas, USA, 2017.

Abstract:

The use of helium-air mixtures to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures in aeroacoustics is plagued by the inability to match exactly the density and sound speed ratios between the jet flow and the ambient field, all the while maintaining the same gas dynamic Mach number and jet exit velocity. Real heated jet flows are typically achieved using either propane combustion in air or kerosene combustion in air, which results in the formation of carbon-dioxide and water vapor byproducts. In an effort to level the playing field between the heat simulated helium-air mixture system and the air breathing combustion system, a theoretical model is developed to isolate the effect of combustion byproducts on these aeroacoustic parameters to see if similar discrepancies arise. The motivation is to narrow the gap between laboratory and full-scale jet noise testing. Gas properties from the new combustion model are validated by laboratory measurements of a real propane combustion system as well as outputs from NASA’s Chemical Equilibrium with Applications code. The findings reveal how the additional combustion byproducts from propane combustion in air and kerosene combustion in air have a negligible effect on the parameters relevant to jet noise. Closer inspection of the helium-air mixture system demonstrates how variations in the Mach wave radiation angle at moderate pressure and temperature ratios of the nozzle is accurate to within a couple of degrees, relative to a pure heated air system. Similar accuracy is reported with the far-field intensity.

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