Publications by Type: Conference Proceedings

2014
D. Glosser, Cook, A., Malinverno, A., and Daigle, H., “Numerical Modeling of Methanogenesis at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1. pp. 07, 2014.
H. Daigle, Piña, O., Screaton, E., and James, S., “Physical properties of southern Alaska margin sediments in the context of global convergent margins,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1. pp. 4541, 2014.
R. Stover, Murthy, A., Gourisankar, S., Nie, G., Martinez, M., Truskett, T., Sokolov, K., and Johnston, K., “Plasmonic biodegradable gold nanoclusters with high NIR-absorbance for biomedical imaging,” SPIE BiOS. International Society for Optics and Photonics, pp. 89550T-89550T-7, 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Gold plasmonic nanoparticles are receiving attention for a variety of types of NIR optical biomedical imaging including photoacoustic imaging. Herein we present a novel method to assemble equilibrium gold nanoclusters from 5 nm primary gold nanospheres, which exhibit high near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and subsequently fully dissociate back to primary particles, which has the potential to enable renal clearance. The nanoparticle assembly is manipulated via controlling colloidal interactions, specifically electrostatic repulsion and depletion attraction. The charge on the primary ~5 nm gold nanospheres is tailored via place exchange reactions with a variety of biocompatible ligands such as citrate, lysine and cysteine. The primary particles form clusters upon addition of a biodegradable polymer, PLA(1k)-b- PEG(10k)-b-PLA(1k), followed by controlled solvent evaporation. The cluster size may be tuned from 20-40 nm in diameter by manipulating the gold and polymer concentrations along with the solvent evaporation extent. Salt is also added to increase the NIR absorbance and reduce the nanocluster size by reducing polymer adsorption. The adsorption of the polymer onto the Au surfaces effectively quenches the nanoclusters. High NIR absorption facilitates photoacoustic imaging, even for the small cluster sizes. In response to acidic cellular pH environments, the polymer degrades and the clusters dissociate back to primary particle on the order of 5 nm, which are small enough for renal clearance. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only
E. Ortega and Torres-Verdín, C., “

New analytical method to calculate matrix and fluid corrected total porosity in organic shale (Expanded Abstract)

,” Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) 2014 Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2014.
E. Ortega and Torres-Verdín, C., “

New analytical method to calculate matrix- and fluid-corrected total porosity in organic shale (Expanded Abstract)

,” Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) 2014 Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2014.
H. Daigle*, Johnson, A., Gips, J. P., and Sharma, M., “Porosity evaluation of shales using NMR secular relaxation,” Unconventional Resources Technology Conference, Denver, Colorado, 25-27 August 2014. Society of Exploration Geophysicists, American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Society of Petroleum Engineers, pp. 1205-1216, 2014.
E. Bakolas, “

Partitioning Algorithms for Homogeneous Multi-Vehicle Systems with Planar Rigid Body Dynamics

,” Conference on Decision and Control. Los Angeles, CA, 2014.
A. L'Afflitto, Haddad, W. M., and Bakolas, E., “

State Feedback Control for Optimal Partial Asymptotic Stabilization

,” Conference on Decision and Control 2014. Los Angeles, CA, 2014.
O. Ajayi, Torres-Verdín, C., and Preeg, W. E., “Rapid simulation and inversion-based interpretation of gamma ray spectroscopy logs in high-angle and horizontal wells (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) 55th Ann. Logging Symposium. Abu Dhabi, UAE, 2014.
O. Ajayi, Torres-Verdin, C., and Preeg, W. E., “Rapid simulation and inversion-based interpretation of gamma ray spectroscopy logs in high-angle and horizontal wells (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) 55th Ann. Logging Symposium. Abu Dhabi, UAE, 2014.
J. J. Hung, Dinn, A. K., Borwankar, A. U., Dear, B. J., Wilson, B. K., Twu, A., Yue, J., Maynard, J. A., Truskett, T. M., and Johnston, K. P., “Self-assembly of tunable protein nanoclusters with molecular crowding agents (depletants),” ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, vol. 247. AMER CHEMICAL SOC 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA, 2014.
A. S. Elhag, Chen, Y., Chen, H., Reddy, P. P., Cui, L., Worthen, A. J., Ma, K., Hirasaki, G. J., Nguyen, Q. P., and Biswal, S. L., “Switchable amine surfactants for stable CO2/brine foams in high temperature, high salinity reservoirs,” SPE Improved Oil Recovery Symposium. Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Description of the material. Stable CO2/water (C/W) foams at high temperatures and salinities have been achieved with substituted amines in limestone, sandstone and glass bead packs with permeabilities from 1 to 78 Darcy. Foams were formed upon injection of the CO2 soluble surfactant in the CO2 phase and would be beneficial for improving sweep efficiency in EOR process.Application. Despite significant interest in CO2 foams for EOR, very few studies have reported stable foams at high temperatures (120 °C) and high salinities, which are often encountered in the Middle East and elsewhere. The foams provide mobility control and stabilize the displacement front in CO2flooded zones to improve sweep efficiency.Results, Observations, Conclusions. The amine surfactants are switchable between the nonionic and cationic states with pH or the nature of the solvent. They exhibit nonionic behavior when introduced in the CO2 phase, which favors injectivity, and cationic in the presence of concentrated brine with dissolved CO2. The hydrophilic/lipophilic balance of the amines was tuned by modification of the amine head group or tail length to design strong foams. It was important to increase the basicity of surfactants to enhance the solvation in the aqueous phase over a pH range of 4 to 7. These surfactants were effective in lowering the interfacial tension between water and CO2 at high temperature and salinity. They generated viscous C/W foams in limestone, sandstone and glass bead packs at 120 °C in the presence of 22% TDS brine when surfactants were injected from either the aqueous or CO2 phase. At pH below 6, these surfactants exhibited low oil/water partition coefficients on the order of 0.1 which suggests that these surfactants will have minimal retardation due to partitioning into oil in the EOR process.Significance of Subject Matter. These surfactants stabilized C/W foam at high temperature and salinity, and partitioned to the water phase over dodecane phase for efficient surfactant utilization. The high solubility in CO2 is beneficial for the surfactant to be available along CO2 flow pathways in a reservoir to minimize viscous fingering and gravity override.
2013
R. Fievet, Tinney, C. E., Murray, N. E., Lyons, G., and Panickar, P., “Acoustic source indicators using LES in a fully expanded and heated supersonic jet,” 19th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference. AIAA Paper 2013-2093, Berlin, Germany, 2013.
C. Xu, Yang, Q., and Torres-Verdín, C., “Bayesian hypothesis testing: using fast well-log forward modeling to validate petrophysical rock typing and to quantify uncertainty in deepwater reservoirs (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts 54th Annual Logging Symposium. Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts, New Orleans, LA, 2013.PDF icon PDF
C. Xu, Yang, Q., and Torres-Verdín, C., “Bayesian hypothesis testing: using fast well-log forward modeling to validate petrophysical rock typing and to quantify uncertainty in deepwater reservoirs (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) 54th Ann. Logging Symposium. New Orleans, Louisiana, 2013.PDF icon PDF
H. Adiguna and Torres-Verdín, C., “Comparative study for the interpretation of mineral concentrations, total porosity, and TOC in hydrocarbon-bearing shale from conventional well logs (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petroleum Engineers 2013 Annual Technical Proceedings and Exhibition. Society of Petroleum Engineers, New Orleans, LA, 2013.PDF icon PDF
H. Adiguna and Torres-Verdín, C., “Comparative study for the interpretation of mineral concentrations, total porosity, and TOC in hydrocarbon-bearing shale from conventional well logs (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) 2013 Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. New Orleans, LA, 2013.PDF icon PDF
A. Aroonsri, Worthen, A. J., Hariz, T., Johnston, K. P., Huh, C., and Bryant, S. L., “Conditions for generating nanoparticle-stabilized CO2 foams in fracture and matrix flow,” SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Foams used for mobility control in CO2 flooding, and for more secure sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, can be stabilized with nanoparticles, instead of surfactants, bringing some important advantages. The solid nature of the nanoparticles in stabilized foams allows them to withstand the high-temperature reservoir conditions for extended periods of time. They also have more robust stability because of the large adsorption energy required to bring the nanoparticles to the bubble interface. Silica nanoparticle-stabilized CO2-in-brine foams were generated by the co-injection of CO2 and aqueous nanoparticle dispersion through beadpacks, and through unfractured and fractured sandstone cores. Foam flow in rock matrix and fracture, both through Boise and Berea sandstones, was investigated. The apparent viscosity measured from foam flow in various porous media was also compared with that measured in a capillary tube, installed downstream of beadpacks and cores. The domain of foam stability and the apparent foam viscosity in beadpacks was first investigated with focus on how the surface wettability of nanoparticles affects the foam generation. A variety of silica nanoparticles without any surface coating and with different coatings were tested, and the concept of hydrophilic/CO2-philic balance (HCB) was found to be very useful in designing surface coatings that provide foams with robust stability. Opaque, white CO2-in-water foams (bubble diameter < 100 µm) were generated with either polyethyleneglycol-coated silica or methylsilyl-modified silica nanoparticles with CO2 densities between 0.2 and 0.9 g/cc. The synergistic interactions at the surface of nanoparticles (bare colloidal silica) and surfactant (caprylamidopropyl betaine) in generating stable CO2 foams were also investigated. The common and distinct requirements to generate stable CO2 foams with 5-nm silica nanoparticles, in rock matrices and in fractures, were characterized by running foam generation experiments in Boise and Berea sandstone cores. The threshold shear rates for foam generation in matrix and in fracture, both in Boise and Berea sandstones, were characterized. The ability of nanoparticles to generate foams only above a threshold shear rate is advantageous, because high shear rates are associated with high permeability zones and fractures. Reducing CO2 mobility in these zones with foam diverts CO2 into lower permeability regions that still contain unswept oil.
C. Xu, Torres-Verdín, C., Yang, Q., and Diniz-Ferreira, E., “Connate water saturation – irreducible or not: The key to reliable hydraulic rock typing in reservoirs straddling multiple capillary windows (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petroleum Engineers 2013 Annual Technical Proceedings and Exhibition. Society of Petroleum Engineers, New Orleans, LA, 2013.PDF icon PDF
C. Xu, Torres-Verdín, C., Yang, Q., and Diniz-Ferreira, E., “Connate water saturation – irreducible or not: The key to reliable hydraulic rock typing in reservoirs straddling multiple capillary windows (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) 2013 Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. New Orleans, LA, 2013.PDF icon PDF

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