Publications by Type: Conference Proceedings

2014
M. Nole, Daigle, H., and Mohanty, K. K., “Basin-Scale Modeling of Methane Hydrate Accumulations in the Gulf of Mexico,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1. pp. 1110, 2014.
J. R. Laber, Borwankar, A. U., Maynard, J. A., Truskett, T. M., and Johnston, K. P., “Biochemical characterization of the low viscosity reversible protein nanocluster platform,” ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, vol. 247. AMER CHEMICAL SOC 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA, 2014.
R. I. Stover, Murthy, A., Gourisankar, S., Ne, G., Martinez, M., Truskett, T., Sokolov, K., and Johnston, K., “Biodegradable gold nanoclusters which exhibit high-NIR absorbance for biomedical imaging,” ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, vol. 247. AMER CHEMICAL SOC 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA, 2014.
W. J. Baars, Tinney, C. E., and Hamilton, M. F., “Challenges associated with studying nonlinear distortion of acoustic waveforms emitted by high-speed jets,” 43rd International Congress on Noise Control Engineering. Australian Acoustical Society, Melbourne, Australia, 2014.Abstract
Discrepancies between linear predictions and direct measurements of the far-field sound produced by high speed jet flows are typically ascribed to nonlinear distortion. Here we employ an effective Gol’dberg number to investigate the likelihood of nonlinear distortion in the noise fields of supersonic jets. This simplified approach relies on an isolated view of a ray tube along the Mach wave angle. It is known that the acoustic pressure obeys by cylindrical spreading in close vicinity to the jet before advancing to a spherical decay in the far-field. Therefore, a ‘piecewise-spreading regime’ model is employed in order to compute effective Gol’dberg numbers for these jet flows. Our first-principal approach suggests that cumulative nonlinear distortion can only be present within 20 jet exit diameters along the Mach wave angle when laboratory-scale jets are being considered. Effective Gol’dberg numbers for full-scale jet noise scenarios reveal that a high-degree of cumulative distortion can likewise be present in the spherical decay regime. Hence, full-scale jet noise fields are more affected by cumulative distortion.
PDF icon c2014internoise_melbourne.pdf
J. P. Gips*, Daigle, H., and Sharma, M., “Characterization of Free and Bound Fluids in Hydrocarbon Bearing Shales Using NMR and Py GC-MS,” Unconventional Resources Technology Conference, Denver, Colorado, 25-27 August 2014. Society of Exploration Geophysicists, American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Society of Petroleum Engineers, pp. 1217-1225, 2014.
S. M. Mula and Tinney, C. E., “Classical and snapshot forms of the POD technique applied to a helical vortex filament,” 44th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference, AIAA Paper 2014-3257. Atlanta, Georgia. USA, 2014.Abstract
Low-dimensional characteristics of a helical vortex filament from a reduced-scale rotor are investigated using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Measurements are captured by way of particle image velocimetry. Experiments are performed on a 1.0 m diameter, single-bladed rotor in hover. The rotor is operated at 1500 RPM, which corresponds to a blade tip chord Reynolds number of 218,000 and a tip Mach number of 0.23. The blade is set to a collective pitch angle of 7.3◦, which resulted in a blade loading (CT /s) of 0.066. Classical and snapshot techniques of POD are applied to a helical vortex filament, both of which revealed similar characteristics of the dominant modes. Two different techniques (G1 and geometric center methods) of wander correction are applied to test the sensitivity of the low-dimensional characteristics using POD. Using the G1 method, POD revealed that an elliptic instability dominated the energy spectrum of the velocity fluctuations within the tip vortex. However, at early vortex ages an axisymmetric mode, which is found to perform vortex roll-up, is found to be equally dominant. Further, the spatial structures of the most energetic modes derived from POD are found to be sensitive to the choice of the centering technique used.
PDF icon c2014aiaa-atlantamula-3257.pdf
H. Daigle and Dugan, B., “Data report: Permeability, consolidation, stress state, and pore system characteristics of sediments from Sites C0011, C0012, and C0018 of the Nankai Trough,” Proc. IODP| Volume, vol. 333. pp. 2, 2014.
E. Bakolas, “A Decentralized Spatial Partitioning Algorithm Based on the Minimum Control Effort Metric,” ACC 2014. Portland, OR, 2014.PDF icon acc14_eb.pdf
K. Johnston, Chen, Y., Elhag, A., Worthen, A., Xue, Z., Foster, E., Foster, L., Hirsaki, G., Biewlawski, C., and Nguyen, Q., “Design of surfactants and nanoparticles for CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and electromagnetic imaging,” ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, vol. 247. AMER CHEMICAL SOC 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA, 2014.
M. Nole and Daigle, H., “Determining Methane Hydrate Equilibrium Conditions in Sediments from the Nankai Trough,” Offshore Technology Conference. Offshore Technology Conference, 2014.
J. Dong, Worthen, A. J., Chen, Y., Foster, L. M., Bollinger, J. A., Truskett, T. M., Bryant, S. L., Bielawski, C. W., and Johnston, K. P., “Effective oil dispersible clay-based dispersant systems for oil-in-seawater emulsions,” ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, vol. 247. AMER CHEMICAL SOC 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA, 2014.
J. H. Stephenson and Tinney, C. E., “Extracting blade vortex interactions from using continuous wavelet transforms,” American Helicopter Society 70th Annual Forum. Montreal, Canada, 2014.PDF icon c2014ahs-montrealstephenson.pdf
T. Coolbaugh, John, V., Johnston, K., Valsaraj, K. T., McCormick, A., Bose, A., and Krishnamoorti, R., “Fundamental Aspects of the Science and Engineering of Oil Spill Dispersant Systems: An Overview of Recent Research Activities of the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative-funded CMEDS Project,” International Oil Spill Conference Proceedings, vol. 2014, no. 1. American Petroleum Institute, pp. 721-732, 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Upon consideration of dispersant-related research, both before and after the Macondo Well oil release, it can be divided into two general categories: (1) the fundamentals of how dispersants work and the effects that may result from their use (e.g., physicochemical and transport characteristics of drops, bubbles, hydrates, surfactants), and (2) an applied focus that has emphasized the design of new dispersants or an enhancement of the performance of those products that are currently available. While there is an extensive amount of data relating to dispersants, a main focus has been on the demonstration of their effectiveness in bench tests and examination of the toxicity of dispersants and dispersed oil. As a result, there is a need for an enhanced understanding of dispersant and dispersed oil thermodynamics and their fate and transport, with a goal to translate the science and engineering to the development of new, effective dispersant systems. The focus of the work to be discussed addresses the following areas: Formation of small oil droplets: Widely dispersed stable oil droplets in the water column are easily accessible to microbes and therefore highly susceptible to degradation. It is important therefore, to understand the fundamental mechanisms of oil breakup and colloidal stabilization in order to develop new and effective dispersants. Dispersant-related processes under deep sea conditions: Current dispersants have been developed for surface spills. The efficacy of such formulations when applied at the high pressures and low temperatures representative of deep ocean release has not been systematically studied. Because of concomitant gas release at the discharge point, and the pressures involved, the liquid droplet is essentially a gas-expanded liquid which could behave quite differently when treated with dispersant components depending upon how they partition at the phase interfaces, i.e., gas/water, gas/oil, oil/water. Fluid mechanics of stabilized oil droplets: Droplet transport, as influenced by all thermodynamic variables of relevance under deep sea conditions, is being studied. Droplet interactions with solid particulates: A better understanding of these processes, either in marine sediments or in the water column, will help predict the environmental fate of the droplets. Development of alternative dispersants: Based on the knowledge gained with respect to the fundamentals, a key goal is the systematic translation of that understanding to the development of new and improved materials. This paper summarizes recent work of a collaborative research effort involving investigators from 22 universities, with particular emphasis on increasing the understanding of the science and engineering of oil spill dispersants.
O. Ijasan, Torres-Verdín, C., Preeg, W. E., Rasmus, J., and Stockhausen, E. J., “Inversion-based interpretation of LWD resistivity and nuclear measurements: Field examples of application in high-angle and horizontal wells (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) 55th Ann. Logging Symposium. Abu Dhabi, UAE, 2014.
O. Ijasan, Torres-Verdin, C., Preeg, W. E., Rasmus, J., and Stockhausen, E. J., “Inversion-based interpretation of LWD resistivity and nuclear measurements: Field examples of application in high-angle and horizontal wells (Expanded Abstract),” Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) 55th Ann. Logging Symposium. Abu Dhabi, UAE, 2014.
E. Screaton, Daigle, H., James, S., Meridth, L., Jaeger, J. M., and Villaseñor, T. G., “Investigating the Role of Dehydration Reactions in Subduction Zone Pore Pressures Using Newly-Developed Permeability-Porosity Relationships,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1. pp. 0805, 2014.
B. J. Dear, Borwankar, A. U., Hung, J., Wilson, B. K., Dahotre, S. N., Maynard, J. A., Truskett, T. M., and Johnston, K. P., “Low viscosity reversible protein nanocluster dispersions with tunable sizes,” ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, vol. 247. AMER CHEMICAL SOC 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA, 2014.
S. M. Mula, Cameron, C. G., Tinney, C. E., and Sirohi, J., “Low-dimensional characteristics of tip vortices from a coaxial rotor in hover,” American Helicopter Society 70th Annual Forum. Montreal, Canada, 2014.PDF icon c2014ahs-montrealmula.pdf
E. Bakolas, “Minimum Time Control for a Newtonian Particle in a Spatiotemporal Flow Field,” ACC 2014. Portland, OR, 2014.PDF icon acc_2014_eb.pdf
B. Ghanbarian, Daigle, H., and Sahimi, M., “A novel approach to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1. pp. 01, 2014.

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